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Taprobana Insula c.1540

Taprobana as shown by the German geographer, cartographer and theologian Sebastian Munster. On some maps of the period Taprobana is depicted as Ceylon (Sri Lanka), and on others as the much larger island of Sumatra. In this particular instance Taprobana has the equator running through the southern part of the island and therefore cannot represent Ceylon which lies north of the equator. The position of the equator and the location to the south-west of ‘Pars Indiae’ suggests Sumatra Island. The name, shape and position of the island in the Indian ocean is derived from an earlier world map of Ptolemy contained in a 15th century (pre-1470) manuscript and represents a vestige of the mythical islands of Ptolemy’s land-locked Indian Ocean (Mare Indicum). The cartouche contains an old Gothic text referring to Taprobana and Sumatra and the commodities available on the island including pepper, one of the major spices produced in Sumatra. The map was probably published in Münster’s Geographia Universalis in 1540.

Size image: 34 cm x 25 cm

 

Rp 480,000

Southeast Asia c.1606

Rp 500,000

Southeast Asia c.1606

Reproduction of a rare early 17th century map of Southeast Asia and the East Indies by Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612) who bought the plates of Mercator’s Atlas in 1604 and added 37 new maps to Mercator’s original number including this beautiful map of Southeast Asia and from 1606 published enlarged editions in Latin and French. These atlases entitled Atlas sive Cosmographicae Meditationes de fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figure, are generally known as the Mercator/Hondius series. The map shows the whole region from the Malay Peninsula to New Guinea with the Spice Islands central, and is closely modelled on Petrus Plancius’ Insulae Moluccae published in Linschoten’s Itinerario ten years earlier. The geography of the East Indian Islands is no improvement on that of Linschoten and De Bry of a decade earlier. In addition to its aesthetic appeal, it is also noteworthy for being one of the few maps to show evidence of Francis Drake’s presence in Southeast Asia during his circumnavigation of the globe in 1577-80. Drake made a landfall on the southern coast of Java, probably in the vicinity of Cilacap and Hondius draws the little known southern coast as a dotted line, save for the presumed point of Drake’s supposed landing which is marked `Huc Franciscus Dra. Appulit (here Francis Drake landed).

size: 53 cm x 40 cm

Rp 500,000

Sea chart of the East Indies c.1666

A fine mid-17th century Dutch sea chart of South-East Asia and Australia by Pieter Goos (1615-1675), noted engraver and publisher of Amsterdam. This interesting map was originally published in the sea atlas ‘De Zee Atlas ofte Water-Weereld’ (The Sea Atlas or the Water World). The chart is oriented with north to the left and shows the result of Abel Tasman’s second voyage. There is a gap in the coastline between Australia (called New Holland) and New Guinea while the two are connected on most other maps of this period.

 

Size: 48 cm x 40 cm

Rp 500,000

Pasar Jakarta c.1926

Rp 480,000

Pasar Jakarta c.1926

Attractive print of a market in Batavia, nowadays Jakarta. The original etching was published in 1923 by the Dutch artist Dirk Homberg.

size image: 57 cm x 24 cm

Rp 480,000

Paradisea Raggiana c.1873

Large reproduction of a magnificent image from Elliot’s Birds of Paradise, painted by Joseph Wolf originally published in 1873.

Size: 61 cm x 49 cm

Rp 650,000

Paradisea Minor c.1873

Large reproduction of a magnificent image from Elliot’s Birds of Paradise, painted by Joseph Wolf originally published in 1873.

Size: 61 cm x 49 cm

Rp 650,000

Nouvelle Carte de L’Isle de Java c.1747

Attractive French map, originally published in one of the latest editions of A.F. Prevost’s l’Histoire Generale de Voyages between 1747 and 1775. The map differs from the earlier versions in having more detail.

size images: 30 cm x 14 cm

Rp 250,000

Mappe Monde c.1724

Rp 500,000

Mappe Monde c.1724

Decorative world map by the great French cartographer Guillaume Delisle (1675-1726), one of the key figures in the development of French cartography who believed passionately in the importance of accuracy. This twin-hemispheric map was originally published by Delisle in 1724 in his “Atlas Nouveau”.The map shows the routes of a number of the world’s major explorers: Magellan (1520), Le Maire (1615), St. Louis (1708), Halley (1700), Mendana (1595), St. Antoine (1710), Tasman (1642) and Quiroz (1605).

Size image: 64 cm x 44 cm

Rp 500,000

Mappe Monde c.1713

Rp 200,000

Mappe Monde c.1713

A very attractive twin hemisphere map of the world by the famous Dutch cartographer Pieter (Pierre) Vander Aa published in his atlas ‘Le Nouveau Theatre du Monde’ in Leiden in 1713.This uncommon decorative world map has vignettes symbolizing the four continents filling the corners and illustrates the routes of several sixteenth century explorers in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, including Magellan, Tasman, Chevalier de Chermont and Mendana. The western coastline of New Zealand is illustrated, along with parts of Australia and Tasmania. The entire northwest coast of North America is blank above the peninsular California. There is a remnant of the coastline that suggested a connection between North America and Asia on earlier maps: here with a notation concerning the discoveries of Vasco de Gamma. The eastern coast of Asia is truncated and a huge Terre d’Yeco forms the northern part of Japan.

Size image: 21 cm x 30 cm

Rp 200,000

Map of Maluku ‘Amboina’ c.1724

Detailed map of Amboina (Ambon) and neighboring islands, from Francois Valentijn’s “Oud en Nieuw Oost Indien”. Francois Valentijn (1666–1727) was a minister, naturalist and writer.
The descriptions A to G in the inset give information regarding the most important comodities in the East Indies: nutmeg and clove trees. The description for A says in Dutch: ‘is the big nutmeg forest ditributed in 1667’. The first sentence for G is: ‘the forest about Locky has an uncountable number of young trees 2 to 3 fingers thick’.
Size image: 79 cm x 32 cm
Rp 480,000

Map of Abel Tasman’s 1ste voyage c.1726

4 out of 5

Mid-18th century map showing the route taken by Abel Tasman on his way to discovering New Zealand, Tasmania, Tonga and Fiji. The map was originally published by Francois Valentyn in his ‘Oud en Nieuw Oost Indien’ (Old and New East Indies). Tasman started his voyage in Mauritius and left Batavia on August 14th 1642, commanded by the VOC, to determine whether the already discovered (north)west Australian coasts were connected with the hypothetical southern continent. The results of Tasman’s second voyage of 1644 are not included in this map.

size image: 47 cm x 31 cm

Rp 480,000

KLM Airlines 1934 Poster

Decorative poster of KLM’s 1934 flight schedule and route map from Amsterdam to Batavia , a 14.350 km long route. KLM proudly advertised that it took five and a half days to reach the Dutch East Indies. Compared to 6 weeks on a ship it sure made a difference! Shown is a globe presented as if seen from outer space, a starlit sky fills in the spaces around the globe which shows the route map. The aircraft shown is a Fokker F-XXXVI.

size image: 62 cm x 89 cm (canvas)

Rp 880,000

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