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Dutch Pioneering Voyage to the East Indies

Map showing the outbound and return routes of the Dutch pioneering voyage to the East Indies between April 1595 and August 1597, this attractive and historical important map covers the whole route from Amsterdam to Java and back.

 

The last decade of the 16th century heralded the emergence of the Dutch as the colonial power that was to supersede Portugal as the premier trading nation in Asia and establish a tyrannical hold on the East Indian Islands and the trade therefrom for the next 350 years. This period of Dutch dominance, begun with the exploratory voyage of Cornelius de Houtman to Bantam, a northwestern port in Java, shown on this fantastic map.

 

Rp 550,000

Carte Des Isles de la Sonde ~ 1773

CARTE DES ISLES DE LA SONDE, ET DES ISLES MOLUQUES.

French map of South-east Asia and the Indonesian Archipelago originally published in Paris in 1773. The map has arrows indicating the prevailing winds (monsoons) in the region during the different months of the year, with the north-west monsoon blowing between October and April and the north-east monsoon between May and September. In the south-west corner of the map is an inset of the clove-producing North Molucca Islands.

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Sea Chart of Indonesia ~ Year 1821

Large and very detailed early 19th century Sea Chart of Indonesia, by the famous English chart maker and publisher John Norie

John William Norie (1772 in London – 1843), was a mathematician, hydrographer, chart maker and publisher of nautical books most famous for his Epitome of Practical Navigation (1805) which became a standard work on navigation and went through many editions as did many of Norie’s works.

Norie began his career working with William Heather, who had in 1765 taken over chart publishers Mount and Page and who ran the Naval Academy and Naval Warehouse in Leadenhall Street from 1795; the Naval Warehouse provided navigational instruments, charts, and books on navigation. Norie took over the Naval Warehouse after Heather’s retirement and founded the company J.W. Norie and Company in 1813. After Norie’s death the company became Norie and Wilson, then in 1903 Imray, Laurie, Norie & Wilson.

Charles Dickens later used the Naval Warehouse in Dombey and Son. Jack London mentions Norie’s ‘Epitome’ in Chapter 5 of his novel Martin Eden, and C. S. Forester refers to it in Chapter 17 in the book The Commodore of the Horatio Hornblower series of novels.

Rp 1,650,000

Universalis Cosmographia ~ Year 1507

The Universalis Cosmographia (“Universal Cosmography”) is a German wall map of the world originally published in the year 1507. It is known as the first map to use the name “America”.  The map is drafted on a modification of Ptolemy’s second projection, expanded to accommodate the Americas and the high latitudes. Of the original only a single copy of the map survives, presently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington.

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Japan c.1679

Rp 550,000

Japan c.1679

Map of Japan engraved by Jean-Louis Durant (1654-1718) and compiled and published by Jean-Baptiste Tavernier (1605-1689) in Paris in 1679.

Jean-Baptiste was the son of the engraver, geographer and map-seller, Gabriel Tavernier, a Hugenot refugee from Antwerp, and had three brothers: Melchoir, also an engraver; Daniel, who joined him in one of his voyages to the Far East and who died in Batavia in 1648; and Gabriel, who established himself as a goldsmith in the Duchy of Uzès. Tavernier’s uncle, also named Melchoir had been an apprentice of Abraham Ortelius in Antwerp. Jean-Baptiste Tavernier made voyages to the East in 1638, 1643, 1651, 1657 and 1663, rossing Persia, the Mogul Empire and visiting many of the islands in the East Indies including Celebes, Sumatra and Java. Tavernier made copious notes during his many travels and, with the help of Samuel Chappuzeau, a fellow Hugenot, wrote a book entitled Les Six Voyages de J.B. Tavernier …. first published in Paris in 1676-77 in two volumes.
Rp 550,000

Indonesian Archipelago c.1578

Spice Islands and the Indonesian Archipelago, entitled Insulae Moluccae celeberrimae. Engraved by Petrus Plancius, the great Dutch engraver and first Hydrographer to the Dutch East India Company (VOC), and compiled from the latest and highly secret Portuguese sources, the map provides the most detailed cartographic knowledge of the region at the end of the 16th century that was collected by Huygen van Linschoten, the young Dutch secretary to the Portuguese Archbishop of Goa.
The map was originally bound into some editions of his seminal work, the Itinerario, especially the English edition of 1578, the first popular sailing guide to the ports and cities of the Portuguese trading empire in the Far East including the Spice Islands, China and Japan. The information portrayed in the map, that could bring the death penalty in Portugal if made public at the end of the 16th century, sold for a few Pffenigs in Amsterdam in 1617.
Rp 550,000

The History of Java by Stamford Raffles

Reproductions of prints from the book The History of Java by Sir Stamford Raffles. The book was published in 1817. It describes the history of the island of Java from ancient times.

 

The prints are available separate or as set. The prices shown apply for separate items. Please contact us for framing options (separately framed or multiple prints framed in one frame) and prices for the set.

Rp 195,000

South East Asia c.1595

Late 16th century map map of South-east Asia by Abraham Ortelius from a Latin edition of the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published by Christophe Plantin in Antwerp in 1595, 1601 or 1609. The Theatrum was the first uniformly-sized, systematic collection of maps ever produced and hence is generally referred to as the first true atlas although the term was not used until 25 years later by Gerard Mercator. The map of Southeast Asia represents a synthesis of the best readily available information on the region from Italian, Portuguese and Spanish sources. Latin text on verso and crossed arrows watermark in eastern sector of the map.

Rp 480,000

Sunda Strait c.1734

Rp 775,000

Sunda Strait c.1734

A New and Correct Chart of Part of the Island of Java From the West End to Batavia with the Streights of Sunda. 

Reproduction of a 18th century engraved sea chart of the coast of Western Java and the southern tip of Sumatra, originally published by John Thornton. The map includes details along the coast that suggest the firsthand surveying that went into its production. Soundings are given from harbor to harbor. Effort has been put into annotating points of interest along the coast, as well as some topographical features along the coastline. Twin flags illustrate the location of Batavia (Jakarta).

The map was featured in the 1734 edition of Mount & Page’s publication of the English Pilot, the Third Book, which was the definitive English-language sea chart book for the voyage to the East Indies when it was first introduced in the 17th century.

John Thornton (1614-1708) served as hydrographer to the Hudson Bay Company and East India Company. Thornton’s two major atlas works were the Atlas Maritimus and the English Pilot in four books. The maps in these books reflected the knowledge he garnered in his respective appointments.

This map is only available on high quality fine art bamboo paper.

Rp 775,000

City view of Batavia c.1724

Reproduction of a beautiful  engraving of Batavia roads, the city of Batavia and the Bogor volcanoes of Panggrano, Salak and Gede. Originally published in Francois Valentijn’s Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien in 1724-1726.

 

Rp 480,000

Nouvelle Carte de L’Isle de Java c.1747

Attractive French map, originally published in one of the latest editions of A.F. Prevost’s l’Histoire Generale de Voyages between 1747 and 1775. The map differs from the earlier versions in having more detail.

size images: 30 cm x 14 cm

Rp 250,000

Two Turtles c.1732

Rp 150,000

Two Turtles c.1732

Reproduction of an attractive 1732 hand coloured copper engraving of two species of turtle.

Size image: 19 cm x 24 cm

Rp 150,000