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Batavia map c.1747

Rp 480,000

Batavia map c.1747

Rp 480,000

Decorative Mid-18th century large German map of Batavia by  Johann Baptist Homann and originally published in the Homannischer Atlas around 1747. The plan shows the city and its immediate environs, the surrounding rice fields intersected by a network of waterways, canals and outlying fortifications. A detailed lettered key identifies the buildings and sites of importance of this capital and administrative centre of the Dutch East Indies. Inset views depict the city, Rathaus and the castle, whilst below there is a full-length black and white panorama of the city from the sea embellished on each side by portraits of native Javanese figures and exotic wildlife including a leopard and a cayman.

size image: 47 cm x 40 cm

Batavia Massacre c.1740

Rp 480,000

An interesting and one of the few prints that show Batavia how it looked like in the mid-18th century. The Dutch  rulers followed the Dutch architactel way of building the houses, roads and canals. The only different was that in Batavia the build sunshades on they buildings. Showing in the print the terrible massacre of the Chinese that occurred in Batavia October 9th 1740, engraved by Adrian van der Laan of Amsterdam. The print shows Dutch troops firing cannon into Chinese houses on the banks of Kali Besar, slaughtering people as they fled their burning homes and waiting in boats to kill those that sought escape in the river; it is estimated that some 10,000 Chinese were killed. The massacre was prompted by tales of Chinese atrocities following the death of 50 Dutch soldiers at the hands of enraged Chinese sugar plantation workers who were protesting about Government repression and the declining sugar prices. This dramatic event is considered as the end of the Dutch golden age.

Size image: 39 cm x 53 cm

 

City Plan of Batavia c.1681

Rp 500,000

This map of Batavia, nowadays Jakarta, was originally published by the Italian historian Gregorio Leti (1630-1710) and was based on the earlier map of Batavia published by Clement de Jonghe in 1650. At the bottom of the map is a view of the city from the sea: for most people this was the first glimpse of the city, after a long sailing journey. Shown are a few Dutch large size sailing vessels, the old Dutch Castle, the canals and the old city walls. 

Size: 50 cm x 40 cm

City view of Batavia c.1724

Rp 480,000

Reproduction of a beautiful  engraving of Batavia roads, the city of Batavia and the Bogor volcanoes of Panggrano, Salak and Gede. Originally published in Francois Valentijn’s Oud en Nieuw Oost-Indien in 1724-1726.

 

Early 20th century Plan of Batavia

Rp 300,000

Map of the old city Batavia, nowadays named Jakarta, the capital city of Indonesia. Originally printed for tourists who were visiting Batavia. The map was originally published by G. Kolff.

size image: 25 cm x 66 cm

Kali Besar c.1926

Rp 480,000

Kali Besar c.1926

Rp 480,000

Attractive print of the trading houses at the Kali Besar boulevard in Batavia, nowadays Jakarta. The original etching was published in 1923 by the Dutch artist Dirk Homberg.

size image: 57 cm x 24 cm

Pasar Jakarta c.1926

Rp 480,000

Pasar Jakarta c.1926

Rp 480,000

Attractive print of a market in Batavia, nowadays Jakarta. The original etching was published in 1923 by the Dutch artist Dirk Homberg.

size image: 57 cm x 24 cm

Plan de Batavia c.1750

Rp 150,000

This French map of Batavia was originally published in Paris around 1750 in A.Prévost’s ‘l’Histoire générales des Voyages’ (General History of Voyages). The map shows the city and castle of Batavia with a key showing the main buildings and areas, the old Dutch castle and the old city walls.

Size: 30 cm x 23 cm

Plan of the Town and Castle of Batavia c.1780

Rp 500,000

Attractive 18th century plan of Batavia with an alphanumeric key showing the main areas and buildings. The plan was engraved by A. van Krevelt of Amsterdam and originally published by Peter Conradi in 1780.

Size image: 63 cm x 37 cm

 

Taman Fatahillah

Rp 150,000

Taman Fatahillah

Rp 150,000

Reproduction of a chromolithograph, after J.C. Rappard from M.T.H. Perelaer’s Nederlandsch-Indie Java Door De Buitenbezittingen published in Leiden in 1883. Shown is the Town Hall of Batavia. This building was the administrative headquarters of the Dutch East India Company and later of the Dutch Colonial Government. The current building was constructed in 1707 by the city government, replacing the former city hall built in 1627. Governor General Abraham van Riebeeck inaugurated it in 1710. As the city continue to expand southward, the building’s function as city hall (Dutch gemeentehuis) ended by 1913. Nowadays the Jakarta History Museum (Indonesian: Museum Sejarah Jakarta), also known as Fatahillah Museum or Batavia Museum, uses this building.

Size image: 23 cm x 17 cm