Welcome to East Indies Art

Cart

Showing all 11 results

Asia c.1604

Rp 480,000

Asia c.1604

Rp 480,000

Reproduction of a rare early 17th century map of Asia by the great Dutch engraver and map publisher Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612), who worked with many of the most prominent cartographers and publishers of maps at the end of the 16th century and the beginning of the 17th century. In 1604 he bought the plates of Mercator’s Atlas which, in spite of its excellence, had not competed successfully with Abraham Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. In order to meet this competition Hondius added 37 new maps including one of the Asian continent and from 1606 published enlarged editions of the so-called Mercator/Hondius Atlas Sive Cosmographicae mediations de fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figura. The new general delineation of Asia was to become the standard delineation of the region for the next 20 years. Hondius included a number of updates on the map with Korea being shown as an island and Japan is shown as three principal islands. The geography of the East Indian Islands is based on the Portuguese sources revealed in Linschoten’s Itinerario (1596) and Theodore De Bry’s Petit Voyages (1598-99). Java is shown with an incomplete southern coastline and New Guinea, which is marked with Spanish place names following, has an accompanying note in Latin stating; “Whether this is an island or part of the continent of Terra Australia has not yet been identified.”

 

Size: 53 cm x 40 cm

Carte des Indes c.1719

Rp 480,000

An exceptional map of the East India Islands originally publsihed in 1719 by Henri Chatelain. Centered on China, Chatelain’s map covers from the Caspian Sea to the semi-mythical Terre de la Compagnie and India to New Guinea. It provides extraordinary detail throughout with topography rendered in profile and numerous geographical and political elements identified.

Size image: 40 cm x 41 cm

 

Carte des Indes Orientales c.1665

Rp 500,000

Important 17th Century map of the Indian Ocean. This elegantly composed map is one of the earliest French maps to show the groundbreaking 17th century discoveries that occurred in Australia. Notably, it features the explorations of Abel Tasman, derived from his voyages to Australia and New Zealand, from 1642 to 1644. Lands recently encountered by Dutch East India Company (VOC) explorers include the south coast of Tasmania, the west coast of Cape York, and the coast of Arnhem Land. Originally first published in 1665 from Duval’s atlas, Cartes de Geographie les Plus Nouvelles. The outlines of the coasts of South and East Asia are very advanced for the time. India, Indochina and the Malaya Peninsula are based on the latest VOC published sea charts, and present a view familiar to the modern observer. The Indonesian Archipelago is generally well formed, although New Guinea takes on a somewhat crude shape. China is shown in fairly assured form and features the depiction of the Great Wall, while Korea is correctly shown to be a peninsula. Japan, south of Hokkaido, is quite accurately represented. Pierre du Val (1619-1683) was ‘Geographe Ordinaire’ to Louis XIV. As evidenced by the present map, Du Val was known for his careful selection of sources and his tasteful, somewhat restrained, employment of ornamentation combined with virtuous engraving.

Size image: 54 cm x 40 cm

India Orientalis c.1638

Rp 480,000

Decorative map of South East Asia, India and western Oceana by Matthaus Merian, based upon William Blaeu’s India Orientalis map of the same period. Matthäus Merian was a Swiss-born engraver who worked in Frankfurt for most of his career, where he also ran a publishing house. He was a member of the patrician Basel Merian family.

size image: 46 cm x 35 cm

India Tercera Nvova Tavola c.1561

Rp 150,000

The strangely shaped islands and early place names provide a fascinating early view of the region on this 450 years old map. This map of South East Asia by Girolamo Ruscelli’s edition of Ptolemy’s ‘Geographia’ was published in Venice in 1561. The crudely executed map shows some evidence of the Portugese discoveries in the early 16th century such as the location of Malacca. East of Malacca is Java Minor, south of Sumatra is Java Major. Little of the Indonesian archipelago is accurately depicted on this early map of the region. The map represents a transition from the old Ptolemaic model of the far east, based largely on the accounts of Marco Polo, and the Ortelian model based on access to the Portugese portolan charts of the area.

size image: 25 cm x 19 cm

 

Indonesian Archipelago c.1578

Rp 550,000
Spice Islands and the Indonesian Archipelago, entitled Insulae Moluccae celeberrimae. Engraved by Petrus Plancius, the great Dutch engraver and first Hydrographer to the Dutch East India Company (VOC), and compiled from the latest and highly secret Portuguese sources, the map provides the most detailed cartographic knowledge of the region at the end of the 16th century that was collected by Huygen van Linschoten, the young Dutch secretary to the Portuguese Archbishop of Goa.
The map was originally bound into some editions of his seminal work, the Itinerario, especially the English edition of 1578, the first popular sailing guide to the ports and cities of the Portuguese trading empire in the Far East including the Spice Islands, China and Japan. The information portrayed in the map, that could bring the death penalty in Portugal if made public at the end of the 16th century, sold for a few Pffenigs in Amsterdam in 1617.

Sea chart of the East Indies c.1666

Rp 500,000

A fine mid-17th century Dutch sea chart of South-East Asia and Australia by Pieter Goos (1615-1675), noted engraver and publisher of Amsterdam. This interesting map was originally published in the sea atlas ‘De Zee Atlas ofte Water-Weereld’ (The Sea Atlas or the Water World). The chart is oriented with north to the left and shows the result of Abel Tasman’s second voyage. There is a gap in the coastline between Australia (called New Holland) and New Guinea while the two are connected on most other maps of this period.

 

Size: 48 cm x 40 cm

South East Asia c.1595

Rp 480,000

Late 16th century map map of South-east Asia by Abraham Ortelius from a Latin edition of the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum published by Christophe Plantin in Antwerp in 1595, 1601 or 1609. The Theatrum was the first uniformly-sized, systematic collection of maps ever produced and hence is generally referred to as the first true atlas although the term was not used until 25 years later by Gerard Mercator. The map of Southeast Asia represents a synthesis of the best readily available information on the region from Italian, Portuguese and Spanish sources. Latin text on verso and crossed arrows watermark in eastern sector of the map.

South East Asia c.1596

Rp 500,000

This highly decorative map was originally published in 1596 by Jan Huygen van Linschoten in his ‘Itinerario’. Linschoten acquired most of the information for the map while serving as the secretary to the Portuguese archbishop in Goa (India) from 1583 to 1589. This map contributed to the end of the Portugese monopoly is the East Indies and opened up the route to the spice islands the Dutch. The map includes a tremendously detailed treatment of the region, displaying a marvelous blend of mythical cartographic detail and contemporary Portugese knowledge in the region. Linschoten also depicts information from the travel account of Marco Polo, including the location of the mythical land of ‘Beach provincia auriferain’ the region where Australia would eventually be discovered. On the mainland the four large lakes in the interior are based on Chinese legend. Korea is shown as a large circular island and Japan is shaped as a shrimp.

Size: 48 cm x 36 cm

South East Asia c.1635

Rp 480,000

The famous early 17th century map of South-East Asia by the great Dutch cartographer William Blaeu. The original map was first published in the two-volume “Nieuwe Atlas” in 1635, showing India and Japan in the north, and New Guinea and partial sections of the coast of Australia in the south, with attractive cartouches for the title of this wonderful map. As the official cartographer to the VOC Blaeu had access to the most up-to-date information, although he is known to have supressed knowledge of Australia for thirty years. “one of the most detailed images of the sphere of operations and Asian trading empire of the Dutch East India Company”.

Size image: 40 cm x 49 cm

Southeast Asia c.1606

Rp 500,000

Southeast Asia c.1606

Rp 500,000

Reproduction of a rare early 17th century map of Southeast Asia and the East Indies by Jodocus Hondius (1563-1612) who bought the plates of Mercator’s Atlas in 1604 and added 37 new maps to Mercator’s original number including this beautiful map of Southeast Asia and from 1606 published enlarged editions in Latin and French. These atlases entitled Atlas sive Cosmographicae Meditationes de fabrica Mundi et Fabricati Figure, are generally known as the Mercator/Hondius series. The map shows the whole region from the Malay Peninsula to New Guinea with the Spice Islands central, and is closely modelled on Petrus Plancius’ Insulae Moluccae published in Linschoten’s Itinerario ten years earlier. The geography of the East Indian Islands is no improvement on that of Linschoten and De Bry of a decade earlier. In addition to its aesthetic appeal, it is also noteworthy for being one of the few maps to show evidence of Francis Drake’s presence in Southeast Asia during his circumnavigation of the globe in 1577-80. Drake made a landfall on the southern coast of Java, probably in the vicinity of Cilacap and Hondius draws the little known southern coast as a dotted line, save for the presumed point of Drake’s supposed landing which is marked `Huc Franciscus Dra. Appulit (here Francis Drake landed).

size: 53 cm x 40 cm